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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Seasonal Interest: Fall+ Spread: 1 - 3 ft+ Botanical Name: D - F, M - O
Displaying 1 - 20 of 50 listings   1 | 2 | 3View AllNext > Sort By: Sort
Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff' Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff'
(Dahlia)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With its deep purple-black leaves and brilliant summer blooms, 'Bishop of Llandaff' is a fine addition to the sunny bed or border. The 4- to 6-inch-round red-petaled flowers have deep purple and yellow centers, which are set off nicely by the plant's dark foliage. Use this long-stemmed cultivar in cut-flower arrangements. -Gerald Gibbens, Regional Picks: Northwest, Fine Gardening issue#120

Dahlia 'Jersey Beauty' Dahlia 'Jersey Beauty'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The 20th century's most celebrated dahlia is 'Jersey Beauty'. This towering, 4- to 6-foot-tall 1920s classic will produce so many lively, true-pink, classic dahlia flowers that you can cut all you want and still have a great garden display. This selection is exceptionally vigorous and beautiful.

Dahlia 'Kaiser Wilhelm' Dahlia 'Kaiser Wilhelm'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Of the maybe 10,000 named dahlias introduced in the 1800s—when dahlias ranked right up there with roses in popularity—only three survive. One of them is 'Kaiser Wilhelm', introduced in 1892. Its 3-inch flowers have neatly curled petals of soft custard-yellow brushed with burgundy, and a green button eye just like that of an old rose. The plant can grow to 5 feet.

Dahlia 'Kidd's Climax' Dahlia 'Kidd's Climax'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The pink-and-cream dinner-plate-sized 'Kidd's Climax' of 1947 has 10-inch flowers atop 4-foot-tall plants.

Dahlia 'Mystic Illusion' Dahlia 'Mystic Illusion'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This new dahlia has gorgeous, bright yellow blooms that pop against its rich, dark purple (nearly black) foliage. 'Mystic Illusion' is well branched and makes a strong statement in beds, borders, and containers.

Daphne × burkwoodii 'Briggs Moonlight' Daphne × burkwoodii 'Briggs Moonlight'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This stunning specimen has luminous, creamy-ivory leaves and narrow green margins. The pale pink flowers are secondary to the glamorous foliage, which can light up a shady border and create definitive contrast.

Darmera peltata Darmera peltata
(Indian rhubarb, Umbrella plant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Darmera's flower stalks emerge from the ground on naked stems in spring, and are followed by cupped, rounded but indented leaves up to 24 inches across. The foliage forms a lovely, vase-like clump, 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide. The flower clusters are composed of many 5-petaled, starry, pink or white florets with conspicuous stamens. This native of the western U.S. is found growing along woodland stream banks, and helps to add a tropical look to temperate gardens. Darmera makes a distinct and long-lasting foliage statement in moist conditions, and exhibits autumn color also. 

Diascia barberae Diascia barberae
(Twinspur)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This softly textured tender perennial (or annual) produces delicate, loose spires in summer and fall. Diascia is at home spilling onto a walkway or filling in between more structured plants. 

Dicentra eximia ‘Alba’ Dicentra eximia ‘Alba’
(Fringed bleeding heart, Turkey corn)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Rows of white flowers dangle above the fern-like foliage, opening in April and continuing intermittently until October.

Diphylleia cymosa Diphylleia cymosa
(Umbrella leaf)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Wide and distinct umbrella-like leaves form beautiful clumps in a woodland setting. The small white flowers, which persist throughout the season, transform into striking umbels of blue-black berries on cerise stalks.

Dryopteris erythrosora Dryopteris erythrosora
(Autumn fern, Pink shield fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In spring, autumn fern’s fronds unfurl a copper red, then turn to bronze, and finally become a shiny dark green. The fronds are upright and lend a lacy texture to the woodland garden. This fern is usually deciduous. -Lou Anella, Regional Picks: Southern Plains, Fine Gardening issue #127

Dyckia fosteriana 'Cherry Cola' Dyckia fosteriana 'Cherry Cola'
('Cherry Cola' dyckia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Cherry Cola' , a relatively new cultivar, features deep, dark burgundy foliage and small but sharp teeth (handle with care!). In summer, orange blossoms appear, and hummingbirds love them. Like other Dyckias, this plant tolerates extreme heat and is perfect for hot, dry locations. -Jeff Moore, Regional Picks: Southwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

Echinacea 'Art's Pride' Echinacea 'Art's Pride'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cross of E. purpurea 'Alba' and E. paradoxa bears narrow coppery-orange ray petals and prominent deep brown central cones. The fragrant blooms open from early to late summer with sporadic later bloom. It has semi-glossy leaves and grows 2 to 3 feet tall.

Echinacea 'Harvest Moon' Echinacea 'Harvest Moon'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, earthy-gold petals and golden orange central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Sundown' Echinacea 'Sundown'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, russet-orange petals and reddish-brown central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Sunrise' Echinacea 'Sunrise'
(Coneflower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, pale citron petals and green-maturing-to-copper central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Sunset' Echinacea 'Sunset'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant, vibrant salmon-orange petals and brown central cones. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

Echinacea 'Twilight' Echinacea 'Twilight'
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the exceptional Big Sky™ series (E. paradoxa crossed with E. purpurea), bearing fragrant rose-colored petals and stunning red central cones on 24-inch plants. These hybrids have all inherited the large green leaves, strong branching stems, wide flower petals, and profuse blooming tendencies of E. purpurea.

no image available Echinacea angustifolia
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow perennial has daisy-like blossoms in early summer. It bears copper-orange central cones surrounded by short, arching, ray petals in pink or purple-pink, and occasionally white.

Echinacea purpurea Echinacea purpurea
(Purple coneflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Because of its carefree performance, this native meadow perennial with daisy-like flowers appropriately inhabits the gardens of many. It blooms from midsummer into early autumn, with prominent, copper-orange central cones surrounded by rose-purple, ray petals (to 5 inches across).


Displaying 1 - 20 of 50 listings   1 | 2 | 3View AllNext > Sort By: Sort