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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Characteristics: Self Seeds+ Spread: 1 - 3 ft
Displaying 1 - 95 of 95 listings   1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5View All Sort By: Sort
Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’ Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’
(Blue Fortune hyssop)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Blue Fortune' produces spikes of powder-blue flowers held over large, deep green foliage. The plant stands approximately 36 inches tall with a mature width of 18 inches. Peak bloom occurs in midsummer when butterflies are plentiful.

Agastache cana Agastache cana
(Texas hummingbird mint, Mosquito plant, Wild hyssop)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is a 36-inch-tall hyssop with showy rose-pink flower spikes in late summer and fall and licorice-mint scented foliage. It is native to New Mexico and western Texas and attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Grow in a border, herb garden, rock garden, or butterfly garden. Rubbing the foliage on skin reportedly repels mosquitoes.

Alcea rosea Alcea rosea
(Hollyhock)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tall, upright perennial has single flowers of various colors that grow along a spike. It blooms in early summer and midsummer.

Alchemilla mollis Alchemilla mollis
(Lady's mantle)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant has lobed, densely hairy, chartreuse foliage that is crimped at the edges. Soft, frothy, yellow-green foliage hovers above the plant from early summer through autumn.

Angelica pachycarpa Angelica pachycarpa
(Angelica)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Angelica is a striking ornamental biennial or short-lived perennial with jade green, glossy, bold leaves and large umbels of white flowers. It makes a unique statement in the garden.

Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing' Anthriscus sylvestris 'Ravenswing'
(Ravenswing)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is the bronze-purple form of the common Queen Anne's lace. It produces beautiful, highly fringed, lacy foliage in a dusky purple.

Aquilegia caerulea Aquilegia caerulea
(Rocky Mountain columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Rocky Mountain columbine is a beautiful, hearty, native perennial with blue and white flowers. It self-sows readily.

Aquilegia chrysantha Aquilegia chrysantha
(Golden columbine, Yellow columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A. chrysantha is a vigorous grower that will add a real burst of color to any southern garden. This southwestern U.S. native has 3-inch yellow flowers in spring and reaches almost 3 feet tall.

no image available Aquilegia longissima
(Longspur columbine)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species of Aquilegia is short lived, but its bright yellow, fragrant flowers with elongated spurs will be a vibrant addition to your garden.

Asclepias tuberosa Asclepias tuberosa
(Butterfly weed)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Butterfly weed is a native perennial with flat-topped, orange or yellow flower clusters at the ends of its stems or in its leaf axils. From midsummer to autumn, it produces clusters of brightly colored flowers that attract insects, followed by fruit and showy seed. Plant in a border, meadow, butterfly garden, or wildflower garden.

Baptisia australis Baptisia australis
(blue false indigo, Plains false indigo)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

False blue indigo's spikes of clear blue flowers in late spring can nearly carry a border by themselves. They also make great cut flowers. Large, inflated nearly black seed pods set in after flowering, giving this plant another interesting element. It is low maintenance and will look great in any natural or informal setting.

Begonia grandis ssp. evansiana Begonia grandis ssp. evansiana
(Hardy begonia)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tuberous begonia bears green heart-shaped foliage with red veining and claret-stained undersides that steal the show when backlit. Pendent clusters of slightly fragrant, satiny pink or white blossoms open from midsummer until frost. It makes a good perennial companion for ferns and hostas.

Bidens aristosa Bidens aristosa
(Tickseed sunflower, Long-bracted beggar-ticks)
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This fast-growing annual of the Midwestern wet meadows grows to 4 or 5 feet tall. Hundreds of 2-inch golden daisies with buttery tips and dark, fringed eyes smother fine foliage in late summer. Be cautioned, this plant generously self-sows, and is on Kentucky's invasive plant list.

Browallia americana Browallia americana
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant produces distinct, 2-inch blossoms primarily in rich blue (but also in shades of purple and white), with dark eyes smudged white. It is suitable for sun and partial shade.

Calamintha nepeta Calamintha nepeta
(Lesser calamint)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Lesser calamint produces fine, upright stems which are covered with small, shiny, dark green leaves, forming a little bush from 12 to 18 inches tall, and twice as wide. In late August, it produces a cloud of infinitesimal pale lavender flowers that continue blooming for up to six weeks. As the days become cooler, the color of the tiny, lipped blossoms deepens.

Campanula lactiflora Campanula lactiflora
(Milky bellflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This upright bellflower grows to 4 or 5 feet with rounded leaves and conical spires of bell-shaped flowers in shades of blue, violet, or white.

Campanula persicifolia Campanula persicifolia
(Peach-leaved bellflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant is one of the most popular campanulas. Its stiff mat of slowly spreading evergreen rosettes is topped by 3-foot-tall, all open, bell-shaped lavender to white flowers in late spring.

Carex buchananii Carex buchananii
(Leatherleaf sedge)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Two-foot-tall, stiff, orange-brown blades curve at the end like a shepherd’s staff. Burnished red-bronze foliage, which fades to flax at the tips, gives off a warm glow when backlit by the sun.

Centaurea montana Centaurea montana
(Mountain bluet)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Mountain bluet is an excellent choice for the border or rock garden. Blue flowers open from attractive buds in late spring to midsummer, then leave behind a mass of vigorous, silvery-green woolly foliage and woolly stems.

no image available Centranthus ruber
(Red valerian, Jupiter's beard, Keys of heaven)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clump-forming perennial has deep to mid-green leaves and dense clusters of small white, pale rose-pink, or dark crimson flowers in long, slender stems. It blooms from late spring to late summer.

Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’ Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’
(Blue shrimp plant)
(1 user review)

Though subtly colored, Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’ draws comment wherever it inserts itself. The steely purple bracts and leathery gray foliage of this annual seem extraterrestrial poking up among more conventional herbaceous plants. It is an annual from the Mediterranean region with leaves like a eucalyptus and flowers like a purple euphorbia. This plant produces large black seeds that drop to the ground in late summer and germinate in fall to start the cycle all over again if growing conditions are right.

Chamaecrista fasciculata Chamaecrista fasciculata
(Partridge pea, Senna, Sleeping plant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This colorful annual legume bears attractive yellow flowers that have reddish-purple spots at their base. The compound, feathery leaves look like those of sensitive plant. Fruit is contained in a pea pod, which adds additional garden interest and may attract birds.

Chamaemelum nobile and cvs. Chamaemelum nobile and cvs.
(Chamomile)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A hardy perennial, chamomile has aromatic, threadlike leaves that fill the air with a pleasing apple-pineapple scent. White, daisylike blooms appear in summer. The cultivar 'Treneague' is valued because it does not flower, making an attractive lawn. 'Flore Pleno' has double flowers showier than those of the species.

no image available Convolvulus mauritanicus
(Ground morning glory)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Ground morning glory is a trailing low grower with a profusion of funnel-shaped lavender flowers from summer to early autumn.

no image available Coreopsis grandiflora
(Large-flowered tickseed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

As the name implies, this species bears large, daisy-like blossoms (2.5 inches across) of golden yellow rays and darker yellow centers. It blooms from late spring to late summer and is native to the central and southeastern U.S.

Coreopsis lanceolata Coreopsis lanceolata
(Lance-leaved coreopsis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Solitary yellow petals with toothed edges and flat, yellow centers open from early to late summer. Native to the central and southern U.S.

Coreopsis rosea Coreopsis rosea
(Tickseed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant bears a profusion of lavender-pink flowers with yellow centers from mid-summer to early autumn. This perennial has finely textured leaves that give it an airy appearance.

Corepsis verticillata ‘Zagreb' Corepsis verticillata ‘Zagreb'
(Thread-leaved tickseed)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Zagreb' produces star-like blossoms in egg-yolk yellow in early summer on plants 12 inches tall and wide. The sturdy, upright stems and finely textured foliage add delicate texture to the garden.

Corydalis elata Corydalis elata
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fragrant, blue-flowered species is more vigorous and heat tolerant than the blue cultivars. It blooms from late spring to early summer, and its foliage persists throughout the season with adequate moisture.

Corydalis linstowiana Corydalis linstowiana
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces copious purplish-blue flowers in spring and fall. It has light green ferny leaves with a mid-rib of silver.

Cosmos bipinnatus cvs. Cosmos bipinnatus cvs.
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Cosmos are branching annuals with ferny foliage and pink, crimson, or white flowers that work well in the back of a border. Although introduced in 1799, cosmos did not beome popular for the garden or as the subject of breeding efforts until the early 1900s. The rest is now history. The variety 'Sensation' won the All-American Selection Award of Merit in 1936 for its clear colors of pink and white, on early-blooming, 3- to 4-foot-tall plants. 'Purity' is the glistening white form of cosmos in the 'Sensation' series. 'Sea Shells' has quilled florets. The Sonata Series cultivars are dwarf plants only growing to about a foot or two tall.

Digitalis grandiflora Digitalis grandiflora
(Yellow foxglove)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Originating in mountainous woodland and stony habitats from Europe to western Asia, yellow foxglove is tolerant of dry shade but flourishes with moisture. Arising in midsummer from neat clumps of fine-toothed foliage, a mass of soft yellow open bells, speckled brown inside, blooms along one side of a 3-foot-tall stem. Usually described as a perennial, it is more accurate to call it a biennial or short-lived perennial. If the flowering stalk is cut down after blooms have faded, it may rebloom in the fall. When a few flower stalks are left, the plant self-seeds. 

Digitalis obscura Digitalis obscura
(Sunset foxglove, Willow-leaved foxglove)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This foxglove has long-lasting flowers in seductive shades of burnt umber. Its glossy, linear leaves are evergreen in mild climates, but turn brown in colder climates.

no image available Echinacea angustifolia
(Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow perennial has daisy-like blossoms in early summer. It bears copper-orange central cones surrounded by short, arching, ray petals in pink or purple-pink, and occasionally white.

Echinacea purpurea Echinacea purpurea
(Purple coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Create a field full of gorgeous pink blooms with easy-to-grow Echinacea seeds. Butterflies and Hummingbirds will flock to your property each summer and the multitude of blooms make for spectacular bouquets. -American Meadows

Echinacea purpurea Echinacea purpurea
(Purple coneflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Because of its carefree performance, this native meadow perennial with daisy-like flowers appropriately inhabits the gardens of many. It blooms from midsummer into early autumn, with prominent, copper-orange central cones surrounded by rose-purple, ray petals (to 5 inches across).

Echinacea purpurea 'Kim's Knee High' Echinacea purpurea 'Kim's Knee High'
(Purple coneflower)
(3 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow derivative is a compact version of the species. It blooms from midsummer into early autumn, with prominent, copper-orange central cones surrounded by drooping, rose- or purple-pink ray petals. It will reach 24 inches if not cut back.

Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus' Echinacea purpurea 'Magnus'
(Purple coneflower)
(12 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow derivative has vibrant, daisy-like flowers that bloom from midsummer into early autumn. Its prominent, dark orange central cones are surrounded by larger (to 7 inches across) and more horizontal, reddish-pink, ray petals than the species.

Echinacea purpurea ‘Bright Star’ Echinacea purpurea ‘Bright Star’
(Purple coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native meadow derivative with daisy-like flowers blooms from early summer into early autumn. 'Bright Star' has prominent, copper-orange central cones surrounded by red-purple ray petals (to 5 inches across), and grows to less than 3 feet tall.

Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan' Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan'
(White coneflower)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar of a native meadow coneflower has white, daisy-like flowers from early summer into early autumn. Its prominent, coppery-green, central cones are surrounded by large white ray petals that reach 4.5 inches long.

Echinops ritro Echinops ritro
(Small globe thistle)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This compact species has cobweb-like, woolly foliage. The unique spherical flowerheads appear steely blue before maturing to a brighter blue. The late summer flowers add charm of form and texture to a mixed border.

Emilia coccinea Emilia coccinea
(Tassel flower, Flora's paintbrush)
(1 user review)

A captivating little plant for the front of the border, tassel flower produces small, scarlet-orange pompons which, when viewed from a distance, seem like they’re floating in air. The flowers cluster at the top of wiry stems that rise from a basal rosette of blue-green leaves. Plants occasionally self-sow when sited in a good location. With its small habit, tassel flower lends itself well to container gardens and fresh-cut flower arrangements, adding an element of whimsy. Its delicate and airy nature looks best with bold-leaved or showy plants in the background, creating a see-through effect. To magnify their magic, mass several plants together.

no image available Eupatorium rugosum
(White snakeroot)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This eastern U.S. woodland plant has clusters of small, fluffy white flowers topping stiff 3- to 5-foot-tall stems midsummer to frost. 

no image available Euphorbia myrsinites
(Myrtle spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Long-lasting, terminal clusters of lime green bracts and flowers punctuate the meandering 'arms' of this ground-hugging species. The chalky seafoam foliage looks great spilling over a stone wall in a rock garden or at the edge of any bed.

Euphorbia polychroma Euphorbia polychroma
(Cushion spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Electric yellow bracts bloom on a low cushion in April and persist, but gently fade as the stems elongate to form a 16-inch mound by midsummer. The leaves produce shades of red, orange, and purple in autumn.

no image available Euphorbia rigida
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is similar to E. myrsinites, but its habit is first erect before spreading, and its steely blue leaves are more narrow and pointed. It also bears terminal yellow bracts from early spring to summer.

Gaura lindheimeri Gaura lindheimeri
(Wand flower, White gaura, Butterfly gaura)
(6 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This North American wildflower is a bushy, clump-forming, vase-shaped perennial with lance-shaped or spoon-shaped, toothed leaves on slender, wand-like stems. Leaves may be occasionally spotted with maroon. Loose panicles of 4-petaled white flowers open only a few at a time and fade slowly to pink, blooming from late spring to early autumn.

Geranium nodosum Geranium nodosum
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This attractive groundcover blooms all summer and is tolerant of diverse habitats. It has glossy leaves and notched, 1.25-inch lilac-pink flowers with darker veins.

Heliopsis helianthoides Heliopsis helianthoides
(False sunflower, Ox eye, Woodland sunflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clump-forming perennial bears striking, sunflower-like yellow blooms on long stalks from midsummer to early autumn.

Impatiens balsamina and cvs. Impatiens balsamina and cvs.
(Rose-balsam, Touch-me-not)
(1 user review)

This plant has a sparsely branched form and narrow lance-shaped, pale green leaves. Cup-shaped hooded flowers 1-2 inches across, either singly or in clusters, are followed by explosive seed capsules. A variety of colors are available, including rose, lilac, and creamy yellow.

Impatiens namchabarwensis Impatiens namchabarwensis
(Sapphire jewelweed, Blue diamond impatiens)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Sapphire jewelweed's serrated leaves are the color of polished jade, while the flowers are a remarkable sapphire blue. Far different from the traditional flat-disk shape of most bedding impatiens, the flower shape of this impatiens resembles an elegant crane in flight. Sapphire jewelweed grows remarkably fast, reaching almost 2 feet tall and wide. It shines in a woodland garden.

Impatiens walleriana cvs. Impatiens walleriana cvs.
(Busy Lizzie, Patience plant)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This subshrubby perennial with light green to red-flushed stems has slightly toothed, scalloped, light to bronze-green or red-flushed leaves to 5 inches long. The showy, flat flowers bloom in white or shades of orange, pink, red, purple, violet, lavender-blue, and bicolors.

Lychnis coronaria and cvs. Lychnis coronaria and cvs.
(Rose campion, Crown pink, Mullein pink, Dusty miller)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Gray-green, spear-shaped leaves form a low, tidy, circular mound about 1 foot in diameter. This plant puts on a dazzling show of five-petaled magenta flowers on straight stalks about 2 feet high in mid-spring. 

Muhlenbergia capillaris Muhlenbergia capillaris
(Muhly grass)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In autumn, this unique specimen creates a spectacular, billowy inflorescence of massed, vibrant pink, airy flowers on 4-foot stems. It is noted for its tolerance to poorly drained soil. It is possibly hardy to Zone 6 with protection.

Muhlenbergia lindheimeri Muhlenbergia lindheimeri
(Lindheimer's muhly)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful warm-season grass produces attractive, pale purplish-gray plumes in autumn and goes dormant in the cold season. It forms a neat, upright clump with fine blue-gray foliage.

no image available Nigella hispanica
(Spanish love-in-a-mist)
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This easy-going annual has 2- to 3-inch-wide blue flowers with black centers and wine-colored stamens, along with light green ferny foliage. Striking chalice-shaped seedpods form on sturdy stems and are green when they emerge, turning tan as they harden.

Penstemon palmeri Penstemon palmeri
(Palmer's penstemon)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A native of the Southwest, Palmer's penstemon sports sharp, prickly, gray leaves and thrives in the harsh conditions. Snapdragon-like pale pink flowers boom in late spring or early summer, and their sweet-honey scent attracts bumblebees. Toothed, sage green leaves skirt the upright stems for the rest of the gardening season.This perennial wildflower is one of the largest penstemons. It looks good in the back of a border or as a focal point, perhaps near a path where its fragrance can be enjoyed or in an informal grouping with other native penstemons and grasses, or with other plantss that have similar maintenance and water requirements. -Katie Nicolich, Plants to know and grow, Fine Gardening issue #120

Phlox divaricata 'Blue Moon' Phlox divaricata 'Blue Moon'
(Blue phlox, Wild sweet William, Woodland phlox)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar of the popular blue phlox has round, full flowers with overlapping petals. It is noteworthy for its particularly rich blue-violet color. Use it in rock gardens or alpine houses, in a dry wall, or as edging.

Phlox paniculata Phlox paniculata
(Garden phlox, Perennial phlox)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This sturdy, upright perennial reaches 2 to 4 feet tall. In July and August, and through September with deadheading, it bears flowers in shades of white, coral, pink, red, lavender, and violet, depending on the cultivar. Some have a lighter or darker eye, and others have variegated leaves. Many of the cultivars are fragrant; scent is most noticeable at night.

Polemonium caeruleum Polemonium caeruleum
(Jacob’s ladder, Greek valerian)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This North American native bears deep blue or occasionally white, bell-shaped blossoms in spring and possibly late summer if deadheaded. It grows from 1 to 3 feet tall. Use Jacob's ladder in a lightly shaded border, rock garden, woodland, or cottage garden.

no image available Polemonium reptans
(Greek valerian, Jacob’s ladder)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This North American native bears light blue bell-shaped blossoms in spring to early summer. It has a lax, sprawling habit to 1.5 feet tall. The leaflets are arranged like the rungs of a ladder, hence the common name.

Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm' Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii 'Goldsturm'
(Orange Coneflower, Black-eyed Susan)
(12 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Large flowers consisting of brassy orange-yellow rays surrounding brown cones are what make this plant so popular. It blooms for 7 or 8 weeks beginning in midsummer. The flowers top 18- to 30-inch-tall plants that will readily self sow in cultivated soils. 

Rudbeckia hirta Rudbeckia hirta
(Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa daisy, Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived perennial has given rise to numerous cultivars which are often grown as annuals. From summer into early autumn, it bears daisy-like blossoms (to 3 inches across) with light or deep yellow rays and brownish-purple centers. The flowers are a staple in late summer bouquets.

Rudbeckia maxima Rudbeckia maxima
(Giant coneflower, Black-eyed Susan)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This choice species makes a strong vertical statement with its large, smooth, sea-green leaves and towering stems to 6 feet tall. It bears short, yellow ray florets with giant, upright cones at the center. It prefers average soil with good drainage, and is excellent in native or wild plantings.

Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers' Rudbeckia subtomentosa 'Henry Eilers'
('Henry Eilers' sweet coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The unique, finely quilled, 2-inch-wide flowers are what make 'Henry Eilers' stand out from the rest of the coneflowers. The petals sit separate from one another, forming a brilliant, golden yellow starburst around a dark brownish purple cone. The blooms grow on strong, upright, 4- to 5-foot-tall stems in late summer, and are produced in such abundance that you can cut some for bouquets and you'll never even notice they are missing from the garden. The stems are covered with a soft, hairy down, while the leaves have a pleasing vanilla-and-anise scent.

no image available Rudbeckia triloba
(Brown-eyed Susan, Coneflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial makes a superb, self-sown companion in a mixed border or wild garden. It reaches up to 5 feet tall and exhibits a long-lasting, airy spray of small, daisy-like blossoms in yellow with purple-black centers. The flowers are beautiful in late summer bouquets. 

Salvia canariensis Salvia canariensis
(Canary Island sage)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This short-lived, tender perennial shrub native to the Canary Islands off the African coast sends up 6-foot white-furred stems cloaked with long, felted, arrow-shaped leaves and topped, summer to frost, with plumes of purplish violet flowers clasped by red-tipped calyxes. It grows up to 4 feet wide.

Schizachyrium scoparium Schizachyrium scoparium
(Little bluestem, Prairie beard grass)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Little bluestem is a tidy, finely textured clumping grass with a blue-green summer color. Its silvery seed heads rise to a height of nearly 2 feet in late summer and are at their best when backlit in the morning or afternoon sun. In fall, the grass turns a rosy rust color that lasts all winter.

Sesleria autumnalis Sesleria autumnalis
(Autumn moor grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cool-season grass begins the season with bright green blades. In late summer and early fall, it produces silvery inflorescences which complement its golden-hued autumn foliage and persist throughout the winter.

Smilacina racemosa Smilacina racemosa
(Solomon's plume, False Solomon's seal)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shade-loving perennial produces plumes of creamy white blossoms in spring, followed by mottled yellowish-green berries that turn to deep red. The fragrant, ivory white blossoms occur on the ends of arching branches, distinguishing them from true Solomon's seal (Polygonatum). The plant grows to 3 feet high and 2 feet wide.

no image available Smyrnium perfoliatum
(Perfoliate Alexanders)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This spring bloomer produces bright chartreuse floral domes atop bract-like, rounded leaves that are pierced by the flower's stem. This plant's form and color contrast well with spring bulbs. It grows 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide. Let it regenerate itself by self-sowing. It is a biennial or short-lived perennial that makes an excellent cut flower and produces worthy combinations with neighboring shades of maroons and blues. Grow it in large, mixed borders, naturalistic plantings, and open woodlands.

no image available Solidago caesia
(Goldenrod, Wreath goldenrod, Blue-stemmed goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In early autumn, this species produces elegant, wand-shaped flowerheads atop wiry stems with blue-green, linear leaves. It is found in open woods and along woodland edges, and prefers some shade. It responds well to rich soil, but can tolerate dry soil also. 

Solidago flexicaulis Solidago flexicaulis
(Goldenrod, Zigzag goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is aptly named for its distinctive crooked stems that bend back and forth at 45° angles between nodes. It bears starry, medium-yellow flowers atop 1- to 3-foot tall stems. 

Solidago juncea Solidago juncea
(Goldenrod, Early goldenrod, Yellow top)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is the first goldenrod to bloom, featuring bright yellow, plume-like panicles in midsummer. It has dark green leaves along reddish stems, which form a vase-shaped clump when mature. 

Solidago nemoralis Solidago nemoralis
(Goldenrod, Gray goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the smallest species of goldenrod, topping out at only 4 to 6 inches high in poor soils, and 2 feet high in fertile soils. It is considered a garden-worthy species, with gray-green leaves that form clumps and languid, one-sided yellow plumes. It is tolerant of both sandy and clay soils.

Solidago rigida Solidago rigida
(Goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This lovely goldenrod has velvety leaves that are gray-green in summer and dusky rose in autumn. It has broad, flattened clusters of rich yellow flowers, which create a striking display on stems 2 to 5 feet tall.

no image available Solidago rugosa
(Goldenrod, Rough-stemmed goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has open, tree-shaped flower clusters that radiate out like a fountain. It has given rise to S. rugosa 'Fireworks'.  It can grow to 7 feet tall and blooms in mid- to late autumn.  

no image available Solidago speciosa
(Goldenrod, Showy goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This garden-worthy species has dramatic, bright yellow flowers that are arranged into erect, pointed clusters. It has deep reddish stems that grow to 3 feet tall. It blooms in late summer and early autumn.

Solidago sphacelata 'Golden Fleece' Solidago sphacelata 'Golden Fleece'
(Goldenrod, Creeping goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This outstanding cultivar forms a neat, 1-foot tall groundcover. It has dense, branched panicles that splay upward and outward whimsically, resembling a mass of elegantly bunched bouquets. 

Sporobolus heterolepsis Sporobolus heterolepsis
(Prairie dropseed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

The finely textured, green leaves of this slow-growing, clump-forming perennial turn golden yellow in autumn. It bears cloudy panicles of fragrant, pale-pink to tawny flowers 5 to 10 inches long in late summer, reaching 3 feet tall.

Stipa tenuissima Stipa tenuissima
(Mexican feather grass)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

No other grass exhibits quite the refinement of texture as this species. Its bright green foliage resembles delicate filaments that arise in elegant, vase-like clumps and spill outward like a soft fountain. All summer it bears a profusion of feathery panicles, which mature from foamy-green to blonde. It is native to the Americas.

Talinum paniculatum Talinum paniculatum
(Fameflower, Jewels of Opar)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This tuberous-rooted tender perennial is related to portulaca, but has fleshy green leaves and delicate, wiry flower stalks. Stalks have a fine, see-through texture. Minute hot pink flowers are followed by carmine-colored seed pods that are showier than the flowers. The variety 'Kingwood Gold' has chartreuse foliage. Plants can grow to 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide.

Thalictrum rochebruneanum Thalictrum rochebruneanum
(Meadow rue)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This beautiful specimen has tall, delicate stems punctuated by clusters of columbine-like, bluish gray leaves. In summer, it bears sprays of nodding lavender-pink or white flowers with pale yellow stamens that reach as high as 3 feet. Plants grow to 12 inches wide. Plant at the back of a border; it may require staking.

Thalictrum rochebruneanum 'Lavender Mist' Thalictrum rochebruneanum 'Lavender Mist'
(Meadow rue)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This hauntingly beautiful specimen has blue-green foliage along matte, purple-green, willowy stems. At 5 or more feet in height, it has a dramatic yet delicate garden presence. Its sprays of nodding lilac flowers have pale yellow stamens. Plant at the back of a border; it may require staking.

no image available Trillium stamineum
(Propeller toad shade, Wakerobin, Wood lily, Trinity flower, Propeller trillium, Blue Ridge wakerobin)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This striking spring-blooming species features narrow, chocolate-colored petals that twist like a propeller over slightly mottled leaves. It forms a stocky plant, growing to 10-15 inches tall and not quite as wide.

Tropaeolum majus 'Mahogany Jewel' Tropaeolum majus 'Mahogany Jewel'
(Indian cress, Nasturtium)
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This old-fashioned cultivar of the species has a mounding habit and grows 12-18 inches tall and wide. In summer and fall, it bears mahogany red, single to semi-double flowers. The rounded leaves and spurred, five-petaled flowers are edible.

Verbascum bombyciferum Verbascum bombyciferum
(Mullein, Nettle-leafed mullein, Turkish mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived perennial has evergreen woolly leaves like silvery flannel that make sensuous-looking rosettes in the first year. In mid- to late summer of its second year, large sulfur-yellow blossoms open from the bottom up on flower stalks that reach up to 6 feet high. Blooming continues for many weeks. Verbascum bombyciferum has naturalized in regions of the U.S.

Verbascum chaixii Verbascum chaixii
(Chaix mullein, Nettle-leaved mullein, Mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the few truly perennial species of mullein. Pale yellow blossoms with purple filaments bloom profusely on long flower stalks in mid- and late summer, reaching about 3 feet high. Individual flowers are short-lived but numerous, and flowering takes place over a long time. Verbascum chaixii's glossy, dark green rosettes are semi-evergreen. 

no image available Verbascum densiflorum
(Dense-flowered mullein, Large-flowered mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived, semi-evergreen perennial forms rosettes of leaves densely covered with grayish-yellow hairs. In summer, its bright-yellow or occasionally white blossoms flower along erect, branching stalks up to 5 feet high. It has naturalized in regions of the U.S.

Verbascum phoeniceum Verbascum phoeniceum
(Purple mullein, Mullein)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This biennial or short-lived perennial species is one of the earliest mulleins to bloom. Its showy blossoms of dark-purple, violet, pink, or white open along slender 3-foot spires for about two weeks in early summer. Its shiny dark green leaves are ground-hugging and evergreen. It has naturalized in some regions of the U.S.

Verbena bonariensis Verbena bonariensis
(Tall Verbena)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This outstanding annual or perennial deserves its popularity. It makes an architectural statement with slender, willowy stems that stand up to 6 feet tall and do not need staking. It then branches out widely near the top where rich lilac-purple flower clusters stand alone, as if they are floating. This Verbena makes a great see-through plant.

Yucca glauca Yucca glauca
(Soapweed)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This clumping evergreen shrub with narrow leaves produces a startling, 3- to 4-foot-tall flower stalk. The fragrant flowers are pale green or greenish white. It is a tenacious weed in areas of the American West, but adds a touch of the desert to gardens. Soap can be made from its roots and the foliage is used in basket-making.

no image available Zauschneria arizonica
(Hardy hummingbird trumpet, Arizona fuchsia, Firechalice, Wild fuchsia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This heat-loving native Southwestern species has gray-green leaves and grows to 3 feet tall and 2 feet wide. Orangey red, tubular blossoms cover the plant in late summer and early fall.

Zinnia grandiflora Zinnia grandiflora
(Prairie zinnia)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This native perennial wildflower of the American Southwest bears a profusion of bright yellow to golden yellow flowers atop 4-inch high plants that spread to 15 inches wide. They bloom from late summer into fall. 

Zizia aurea Zizia aurea
(Golden Alexander, Golden zizia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This lovely native of the eastern U.S. offers delicate, lemon-yellow broccoli-like flowers in late spring to early summer. Flowers last for weeks. Plants grow to about 2 feet tall and half as wide.


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