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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Tolerance: Drought Tolerant+ Height: 10 - 15 ft.
Displaying 1 - 9 of 9 listings   Sort By: Sort
Chilopsis linearis Chilopsis linearis
(Desert Willow)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Desert willow is shrub native to the Southwest U.S. and Mexico. Its erect willowy foliage is joined by large, blowsy pink flowers from early summer to first frost. This tough plants performs well in xeriscapes and other dry, unforgiving locations. It grows to 10 to 14 feet tall and wide remains blemish-free all season long.

Cotinus coggygria Cotinus coggygria
(Smoke tree, Venetian sumac)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This bushy shrub or small tree has generated many notable cultivars, all of which add great textural qualities to the landscape. It has 6-inch-long frothy plumes that appear after the flowers and give a long-lasting, smoky haze to branch tips. Its green leaves are smooth and rounded and produce brilliant fall color.

Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’ Cotinus coggygria ‘Royal Purple’
(Smoke tree, Venetian sumac)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shrub or small tree has stunning dark red-purple foliage that turns scarlet in autumn. It has plume-like seed clusters, which appear after the flowers and give a long-lasting, smoky haze to branch tips.

Cotinus coggygria ‘Velvet Cloak' Cotinus coggygria ‘Velvet Cloak'
(Smoke tree, Venetian sumac)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shrub or small tree has stunning deep purple foliage that turns orange-red in autumn. It has plume-like seed heads, which appear after the flowers and give a long-lasting, smoky haze to branch tips.

Elaeagnus pungens 'Maculata' Elaeagnus pungens 'Maculata'
(Variegated silverberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This evergreen shrub can light up the dark corners of a garden. It grows quickly, and its branches are arched and somewhat spiny. Bright yellow,  3- to 4-inch-long leaves splashed are outlined in green. The twigs are a metallic copper color, and the undersides of the leaves are specled with a copper color, too. Tiny white flowers appear under the leaves in fall. They are hard to see, but very fragrant. Small orange fruit appear in spring. -Michael Lee, Fine Gardening issue #119

Euphorbia cotinifolia Euphorbia cotinifolia
(Tropical smoke bush, Caribbean copper plant)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

With its woody stems and oval-shaped leaves, this perennial looks a lot like a tree. Like other members of the euphorbia family, it has milky sap and tiny flowers. Most of the appeal comes from the leaf color. dark burgundy on older leaves, a brighter red on new foliage. The foliage generally dies back in winter. -Jeff Moore, Regional Picks: Southwest, Fine Gardening issue #120

Paulownia tomentosa Paulownia tomentosa
(Empress tree, Foxglove tree, Princess tree, Royal pawlonia)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This deciduous tree has thick shoots and large, lobed, bright green leaves. Fragrant pinkish lilac flowers appear in late spring with the foliage. When grown as a perennial, its robust shoots become sturdy stems 2 inches in diameter, with mammoth leaves as much as 2 feet across. Paulownia tomentosa can grow to 12 feet tall in a single season.

Saccharum ravennae Saccharum ravennae
(Ravenna grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This large, clump-forming grass has linear leaves with central white stripes. In late summer it bears huge, purplish-bronze flower clusters, which eventually fade to silver. It resents high fertility and shows considerable drought tolerance.

Viburnum rufidulum Viburnum rufidulum
(Rusty blackhaw viburnum)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

While North American native viburnums occur most commonly in the eastern United States, rusty blackhaw viburnum flirts with the edge of the Plains. One of the most drought-tolerant species in the genus, rusty blackhaw viburnum has neither the showiest floral display nor heaviest fruit production. Still, its glossy, dark green, leathery foliage is reason enough to grow it; the rich burgundy tones of its fall foliage are icing on the cake.


Displaying 1 - 9 of 9 listings   Sort By: Sort