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Browse Plants

Narrowed By:Seasonal Interest: Fall+ Height: 6 - 10 ft.+ Botanical Name: G - L
Displaying 1 - 18 of 18 listings   Sort By: Sort
Grevillea 'Moonlight' Grevillea 'Moonlight'
('Moonlight' grevillea)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This stunning shrub blooms all year in some climates. A fast grower, its large, moonlight-colored flowers and finely divided, gray foliage are a must for any southern-temperate garden. Frost and drought tolerant once established, it attracts bees and hummingbirds and makes an excellent screening shrub.

Gunnera manicata Gunnera manicata
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is the granddaddy of big-leaved perennials. No other plant can so thoroughly alter the scale of a garden while calling such attention to itself.

Hakea laurina Hakea laurina
(Pincushion hakea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Through the fall and into winter, pincushion hakea provides beautiful cut flowers for the holidays; the foliage and seedpods are also great for arrangements. You can prune it into a bushy shape or a slender, small tree. As a member of the Protea family, pincushion hakea does not like phosphorus fertilizer, and like most Australian plants, it prefers to be well mulched so that its specialized roots can extract nutrients from the mulch layer.

Hamamelis × intermedia 'Pallida' Hamamelis × intermedia 'Pallida'
(Witch hazel)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

There are few better winter displays than the blossoms of 'Pallida' witch hazel. Bright green leaves line its flaring branches in spring and summer. After a display of yellow fall color, the plant shows its distinctive branch structure. Around the end of December, clusters of buds begin to open into spidery, pale yellow flowers. These cover the branches until early March, giving off a rich, fruity perfume. This small tree or large shrub grows up to 12 feet tall and wide.

Helianthus angustifolius Helianthus angustifolius
(Swamp sunflower)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

A profusion of golden yellow flowers appears for two to three weeks starting in early autumn. Daisy-like flowerheads are 3 inches across with 15 to 20 yellow ray florets radiating from a flat-topped purple or dark brown cone. The entire plant looks like a giant flame, drawing the attention of gardeners and many species of butterflies, bees, and other nectar feeders.

Helianthus grosse-serratus Helianthus grosse-serratus
(Sawtooth sunflower)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Sawtooth sunflower's abundant yellow daisy flowers bloom from late summer well into fall. The dark green, narrow leaves have a leathery gloss. A well-behaved plant, sawtooth sunflower forms a thick, slowly expanding clump. It can reach 10 feet and taller, depending on conditions.

Hydrangea paniculata 'Tardiva' Hydrangea paniculata 'Tardiva'
(Panicle hydrangea)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Tardiva' is a late-flowering (early to late autumn) cultivar with loosely-packed, sharply pointed white flower heads that turn purplish-pink with age. It is a vigorous, fast growing deciduous shrub that reaches 8 to 12 feet tall.

Hydrangea paniculata ‘Unique’ Hydrangea paniculata ‘Unique’
(Panicle hydrangea)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Unique' bears 8-inch-long white flower heads that fade to pinkish white. It is similar to, but more vigorous than, Hydrangea paniculata 'Grandiflora'. The cultivar name refers to the shape of the flower heads; they are broad at the base and rounded at the tip.  

Hydrangea quercifolia Hydrangea quercifolia
(Oakleaf hydrangea)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Oakleaf hydrangeas originated along the sandy streams of the southeastern United States, and they are more drought tolerant than many other hydrangeas. Their matte green leaves are coarsely textured and deeply lobed, and in fall they turn red and purple. White flower heads form in spring, and as summer draws to a close they turn shades of pink, green, and ecru. -Nellie Neal, Regional Picks: Southeast, Fine Gardening issue #127

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snow Queen’ Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snow Queen’
(Oakleaf hydrangea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar produces 8-inch-long, conical flower heads from early summer on. It is as notable for its distinct, deeply lobed leaves as for its reliably showy, creamy blooms. The foliage produces outstanding fall color and the flowers take on purplish-pink hues when dried.

Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’ Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’
(Oakleaf hydrangea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This cultivar has large flowerheads of intricate double blossoms layered on top of one another. It is as notable for its distinct, deeply lobed leaves as for its reliably showy, creamy blooms. The foliage produces outstanding fall color, and the flowers take on purplish-pink hues as they dry. 

Ilex crenata Ilex crenata
(Japanese holly)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dense, evergreen holly reaches 6 to 10 feet tall and at least as wide. The species is rarely used in landscapes, but there are many cultivars available with more interesting shape and color. This plant grows slowly, but can be invasive. Its dark green leaves are lustrous and the black fruit is hidden beneath them, so it is not obvious as in other hollies. Use Japanese holly in foundation plantings, hedges, beds and borders, or formal gardens.

Ilex decidua Ilex decidua
(Possumhaw holly)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

While the fresh green leaves and smooth, light gray stems are enough to make possumhaw holly an attractive shrub, the appeal of this plant is more evident in late fall. Bunches of small berries form along the branches and turn bright red as the leaves fall off. Only female plants bear fruit (plant at least one male plant for best berry production), which finally becomes palatable to wildlife in the early spring. Possumhaw tends to sucker from the roots, so it's best to allow it to form a multitrunk screen.

no image available Ilex serrata 'Sundrops'
(Japanese winterberry)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This compact deciduous holly reaches up to 8 feet tall with equal or greater spread. Pale yellow berries ripen in September and stand out on reddish-brown branches, persisting into early winter and attracting birds.

Kolkwitzia amabilis Kolkwitzia amabilis
(Beautybush)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Deciduous, suckering shrub bearing a profusion of bell-shaped flowers, pale to deep pink with a yellow throat, in late spring and early summer. Dark-green foliage adds appeal when not in bloom.

Kolkwitzia amabilis 'Maradco' Kolkwitzia amabilis 'Maradco'
('Maradco' beautybush)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Anyone who has grown beautybush knows that it puts on a spectacular pink flower display in late spring and then it goes incognito the rest of the year. This new beautybush, however, commonly known as Dream Catcher™, dazzles the eye with unforgettable, golden yellow foliage that turns to a striking golden orange in fall.

Lathyrus odoratus and cvs. Lathyrus odoratus and cvs.
(Sweet pea)
(1 user review)

This annual climber has winged stems and deliciously fragrant, ruffled blossoms. Many cultivars exist with varying bloom color (solid, mixed, or bicolor), size, and climbing habit.

Lindera benzoin Lindera benzoin
(Spicebush)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This dioecious shrub has much to offer the garden. Male plants have showier, tiny, pale yellow flowers in early spring, but the female counterparts take center stage in early fall, when they're laden with half-inch-diameter berries that turn from green to yellow to high-gloss crimson. About the same time, the leaves turn a hypnotic soft yellow and make the red berries visually pop. Spicebush becomes a large, 5- to 8-foot-tall shrub that is slightly wider than tall. It is the preferred food for the black and blue spicebush swallowtail butterfly larvae.


Displaying 1 - 18 of 18 listings   Sort By: Sort