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Narrowed By:Zone: 9+ Uses: Beds and Borders
Displaying 681 - 700 of 763 listings   < Prev1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39View AllNext > Sort By: Sort
no image available Solidago caesia
(Goldenrod, Wreath goldenrod, Blue-stemmed goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

In early autumn, this species produces elegant, wand-shaped flowerheads atop wiry stems with blue-green, linear leaves. It is found in open woods and along woodland edges, and prefers some shade. It responds well to rich soil, but can tolerate dry soil also. 

Solidago cutleri 'Goldrush' Solidago cutleri 'Goldrush'
(Goldenrod, Alpine goldenrod, Cutler's alpine goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Goldrush' heralds the coming of fall with masses of tiny, yellow flowers for four weeks in August and September. Its compact size—about a foot tall—makes it a great candidate for a rock garden or border edge.

Solidago flexicaulis Solidago flexicaulis
(Goldenrod, Zigzag goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species is aptly named for its distinctive crooked stems that bend back and forth at 45° angles between nodes. It bears starry, medium-yellow flowers atop 1- to 3-foot tall stems. 

Solidago juncea Solidago juncea
(Goldenrod, Early goldenrod, Yellow top)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is the first goldenrod to bloom, featuring bright yellow, plume-like panicles in midsummer. It has dark green leaves along reddish stems, which form a vase-shaped clump when mature. 

Solidago nemoralis Solidago nemoralis
(Goldenrod, Gray goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This is one of the smallest species of goldenrod, topping out at only 4 to 6 inches high in poor soils, and 2 feet high in fertile soils. It is considered a garden-worthy species, with gray-green leaves that form clumps and languid, one-sided yellow plumes. It is tolerant of both sandy and clay soils.

Solidago rigida Solidago rigida
(Goldenrod, Stiff goldenrod)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This lovely goldenrod has velvety leaves that are gray-green in summer and dusky rose in autumn. It has broad, flattened clusters of rich yellow flowers, which create a striking display on stems 2 to 5 feet tall.

no image available Solidago rugosa
(Goldenrod, Rough-stemmed goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has open, tree-shaped flower clusters that radiate out like a fountain. It has given rise to S. rugosa 'Fireworks'.  It can grow to 7 feet tall and blooms in mid- to late autumn.  

Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks' Solidago rugosa 'Fireworks'
(Goldenrod, Rough-stemmed goldenrod)
(30 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This eye-catching cultivar has flower clusters that radiate out in all directions and resemble streaming yellow fireworks. Its form is truly unique and enchanting. It reliably provides end-of-season color in blazing shades of yellow. It grows to 5 feet tall and provides good structure in the garden all year.

no image available Solidago speciosa
(Goldenrod, Showy goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This garden-worthy species has dramatic, bright yellow flowers that are arranged into erect, pointed clusters. It has deep reddish stems that grow to 3 feet tall. It blooms in late summer and early autumn.

Solidago sphacelata 'Golden Fleece' Solidago sphacelata 'Golden Fleece'
(Goldenrod, Creeping goldenrod)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This outstanding cultivar forms a neat, 1-foot tall groundcover. It has dense, branched panicles that splay upward and outward whimsically, resembling a mass of elegantly bunched bouquets. 

no image available Sophora secundiflora
(Mescal bean, Texas mountain laurel)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This flowering evergreen tree has pinnate leaves 4 to 6 inches long. Notched, mid-green leaflets grow in pairs. Pea-like, fragrant blue-violet flowers in terminal racemes appear in spring, maturing to bright red seeds.

Sorbaria sorbifolia Sorbaria sorbifolia
(False spirea)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

If you like plants that stay in tidy, little assigned corners, this is not the plant for you. But if you have a large space to fill and love plants with attitude, this is your baby. False spireas form large masses of arching branches that are covered with green pinnate leaves. Billowy white sprays of flowers appear in mid- to late summer. Mature plants spread where you let them. There is a wide range of closely related species and selections, but there’s not much difference between them.

Sorghastrum nutans 'Indian Steel' Sorghastrum nutans 'Indian Steel'
(Indian grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Golden yellow plumes and a vase-like form give 'Indian Steel' a refined look. On the flower spikes, bright yellow pollen sacs stand out against the darker seed heads. Metallic blue foliage morphs to a coppery tan shade after frost. 'Indian Steel' tolerates a range of soil types, including heavy clay. -Scott Vogt, Native grasses, Fine Gardening issue #124

Sphaeralcea ambigua Sphaeralcea ambigua
(Desert mallow, Globe mallow)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This shrubby, woolly perennial is native to the warmest, dry regions of the US and Mexico. Its large, rose-like salmon-colored flowers appear in loose clusters from spring to frost. It grows to 3 feet tall and almost as wide, and can bloom nearly year-round in warm regions.

Spiraea japonica 'Alpina’ Spiraea japonica 'Alpina’
(Japanese spirea)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This low-growing, clump-forming shrub has a spreading habit, reaching 10 inches tall. Slender branches spread across the ground. Foliage is light blue-green to 1 inch long. In late June, this plant bears clusters of pink flowers; bloom continues into September if deadheaded.

Sporobolus wrightii Sporobolus wrightii
(Wright's dropseed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Largely untried in the northern states, Wright's dropseed is a great new grass that is becoming a substitute in southern gardens for unwieldy pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana). Heat and drought tolerant, its gray-green foliage sports airy clouds of flowers atop tall stems in summer. This grass is good as a single specimen or in a group as a showy backdrop.

Stachytarpheta urticifolia Stachytarpheta urticifolia
(Blue porter weed, Blue rat's tail, Nettleleaf velvetberry)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This pest-free perennial blooms best during warm months. It is strange how these small blue flowers attract butterflies more than large-blooming, showy neighbors. Blue porter weed gradually reseeds nearby for a fresh batch of new plants. Mix with other species of Stachytarpheta for a variety of leaf shapes and colors ranging from purple to coral.

no image available Stipa arundinacea
(New Zealand wind grass, Pheasant's tail grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This evergreen species makes a handsome specimen with narrow, arching foliage that is streaked orange in summer and becomes orange-brown in winter. Its fine, pendent flower inflorescences open purplish-green in midsummer and have a misty quality.

Stipa tenuissima Stipa tenuissima
(Mexican feather grass)
(5 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

No other grass exhibits quite the refinement of texture as this species. Its bright green foliage resembles delicate filaments that arise in elegant, vase-like clumps and spill outward like a soft fountain. All summer it bears a profusion of feathery panicles, which mature from foamy-green to blonde. It is native to the Americas.

Stokesia laevis ‘Peachie’s Pick’ Stokesia laevis ‘Peachie’s Pick’
(Stokes' aster)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This plant grows exuberantly and fills out within a season, yet reaches only 18 to 20 inches tall. It bears terminal, cornflower-like, 2- to 3-inch-wide blue flowers held on strong stems. Plants do not splay open in the middle or fall over like the species does.


Displaying 681 - 700 of 763 listings   < Prev1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39View AllNext > Sort By: Sort