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Narrowed By:Zone: 5+ Uses: Ground Covers + Characteristics: Showy + Tolerance: Deer Tolerant, Drought Tolerant
Displaying 1 - 20 of 97 listings   1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5View AllNext > Sort By: Sort
Ajuga reptans 'Black Scallop' Ajuga reptans 'Black Scallop'
('Black Scallop' bugleweed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Black foliage and spiky blue flowers (which appear in early summer) make a dramatic contrast. 'Black Scallop' thrives in full sun, which intensifies the black color. In full sun, the plant produces numerous runners, which should be thinned to prevent crown rot. In large plantings, you can run a rotary mower with a bagger attachment over the patch to control crowding and keep the foliage fresh. In mixed container plantings, the spilling habit of the plant makes it a standout choice. -Ron Smith, Regional Picks: Upper Plains, Fine Gardening issue #120

Bouteloua gracilis Bouteloua gracilis
(Blue grama, Signal-arm grass, Mosquito grass)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Blue grama is a perennial grass from the Americas bearing unusually bent and flattened inflorescences. Being native to open grasslands, they are drought tolerant and at home in meadows. They provide the garden with shades of tan that persist throughout winter. 

Bouteloua gracilis 'Hachita' Bouteloua gracilis 'Hachita'
('Hachita' Blue Grama Grass)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Hachita' has narrow, blue-green leaves that form dense mounds. In summer, elongated seedheads add visual interest. This tough, drought-tolerant grass thrives in sand or clay soil with full-sun exposure. It needs a setting with good drainage, as it won't thrive in wet conditions. -Scott Vogt, Native grasses, Fine Gardening issue #124

Cerastium tomentosum Cerastium tomentosum
(Snow-in-summer)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Snow-in-summer is great for rock gardens and dry areas, and also works well as a container plant. Plant it on a stone wall for a cascading effect. Snow-in-summer needs room to perform. A single plant can carpet an area as wide as a yard across. After the flowers fade, the silver/grey foliage shines on in contrast to more predictable shades of green.

Convallaria majalis Convallaria majalis
(Lily of the Valley, May bells)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Lily of the valley's bell-shaped, sweetly scented flowers bloom in early spring. It likes partial to full shade and is perfect for a woodland garden. It may not be the best choice for your beds and borders because it tends to spread, but it is a perfect ground cover if you have a large shady spot under some trees.

Coreopsis lanceolata Coreopsis lanceolata
(Lance-leaved coreopsis)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Solitary yellow petals with toothed edges and flat, yellow centers open from early to late summer. Native to the central and southern U.S.

Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’ Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’
(Thread-leaved tickseed)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Moonbeam' produces star-like blossoms of pale yellow from late spring into autumn. This cultivar is widely used because the refreshing tint of yellow compliments so many colors. The finely textured foliage adds interest all season long.

Corepsis verticillata ‘Zagreb' Corepsis verticillata ‘Zagreb'
(Thread-leaved tickseed)
(2 user reviews)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Zagreb' produces star-like blossoms in egg-yolk yellow in early summer on plants 12 inches tall and wide. The sturdy, upright stems and finely textured foliage add delicate texture to the garden.

Dennstaedtia punctilobula Dennstaedtia punctilobula
(North American hay-scented fern)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This fern's lacy foliage smells of freshly mown grass and carpets the woodland or a moist, partially sunny site. The green lushness turns golden in the fall. It is a good choice for rapid naturalizing. Use in a woodland garden or near water features.

Dianthus 'Bath's Pink' Dianthus 'Bath's Pink'
(Cheddar pink)
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Dianthus 'Bath's Pink' is a stunning, wide-spreading ground cover with grassy, blue-green foliage and pink flowers. Use it to edge a bed or grow it in your rock garden for a splash of cool color. To keep its blooms going, be sure to deadhead.

Dicentra formosa Dicentra formosa
(Western bleeding heart)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Don't let its delicate appearance fool you: Western bleeding heart is hardy and tenacious. This elegant, herbaceous perennial spreads slowly from rhizomes to form drifts of soft blue-green, ferny foliage in shady woodland areas. Above the leaves in late spring, pink heart-shaped flowers hang gracefully from long, arched stems, attracting scores of hummingbirds but not the local deer. It is surprisingly drought tolerant during the summer months.

Epimedium × rubrum Epimedium × rubrum
(Red epimedium, red barrenwort, bishop's hat)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Early in the season, the thin, heart-shaped leaves of this plant have a red tinge, which turns to bronze in fall. Plant red epimedium along a path, where its delicate foliage and tiny spring flowers can be admired. -Marty Hair, Regional Picks: Upper Midwest, Fine Gardening issue #127

no image available Euphorbia 'Helena’s Blush™'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This hybrid has petite green-and-cream variegated foliage with a hint of pink on the undersides. It produces chartreuse and apple green bicolored bracts on airy stems.

no image available Euphorbia dulcis
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species produces erects stems of bronzy green leaves and greenish yellow bracts in early summer. In autumn, its leaves turn shades of red, orange, and gold.

Euphorbia dulcis 'Chameleon' Euphorbia dulcis 'Chameleon'
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This notable species produces erect stems of bronzy burgundy leaves and purple-green bracts in early summer. It looks exceptional when placed near contrasting plants. The foliage may be cut back after flowering to produce fresh growth.

Euphorbia griffithii Euphorbia griffithii
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

This species has red stems and dark green leaves, which emerge in spring with a reddish tinge. In early summer, it bears conspicuous bracts of orange-red or red. 

Euphorbia griffithii 'Fireglow' Euphorbia griffithii 'Fireglow'
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Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

'Fireglow' bears conspicuous bracts in vivid orange-fuchsia in early summer. It has red stems and dark green leaves, which emerge in spring with a reddish tinge.  

no image available Euphorbia myrsinites
(Myrtle spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Long-lasting, terminal clusters of lime green bracts and flowers punctuate the meandering 'arms' of this ground-hugging species. The chalky seafoam foliage looks great spilling over a stone wall in a rock garden or at the edge of any bed.

Euphorbia polychroma Euphorbia polychroma
(Cushion spurge)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Electric yellow bracts bloom on a low cushion in April and persist, but gently fade as the stems elongate to form a 16-inch mound by midsummer. The leaves produce shades of red, orange, and purple in autumn.

Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue' Festuca glauca 'Elijah Blue'
(Blue fescue, Gray fescue)
(1 user review)
Hardiness Zones: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

These compact tufts of 8-inch-long powder-blue leaves are well suited for edging and naturalizing in the rock garden. 


Displaying 1 - 20 of 97 listings   1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5View AllNext > Sort By: Sort